Since It Takes a Village …

“It takes a village to raise a child” is probably the single-most profound or useful proverb as far as recognizing the needs of children growing up. Capitalism presupposes that villages need not exist, should not exist, must be destroyed. So, there you see the very heart of the critique–around the world where the State interrupted […]

Insider Outsiders and/or Outsider Insiders? A Proposal Against the Devil’s Bargains of Assimilation or Consumerism for the Formation of (Transracially Adopted) Identity

I hope not to retread overly well-worn material (about the problems or issues of identity), but I feel some threads currently adrift in the ether might usefully get woven together in (something that at least might seem for a  moment) a new configuration. I apologize if this gets longer than desirable (the long post-title makes […]

Notes to the Future: From the Distant Past

Reading Friederich von Schiller’s (1795) almost continuously magnificent “Naive and Sentimental Poetry,” I encountered the sentence.  (I have grammatically modified his pronoun use to avoid the exclusive “he”): All peoples who possess a history have a paradise, a state of innocence, a golden age; indeed, every individual has their paradise, their golden age, which they […]

Private, Public, Communal: Between Private Action and Public Activism

Whatever usually goes by the name “group activities” I rarely am a fan of. So when i read something like this (quoted from here) regarding justice advocacy for involuntarily displaced peoples: We will continue to get no reward for this effort, nor have any resources to assist us, so we must individually find ways in […]

A New Low for Adoption? A New Sign of Hope? Or More Backlash?

I feel it almost gratuitous or senseless to post this update on the legal fandango, all done openly and above board, in the public theft of Veronia from the Cherokee Nation, but nonetheless, the discourse of the article still seems so rich and impenetrable (see here): In the context of that “victory,” however, what I […]

Xenalgia vs. Nostalgia: a Proposal

Elsewhere, the “dis-ease” of nostalgia has recently been invoked. The medicalisation of this term already raises interesting questions, and its etymology sheds further light on this: 1770, “severe homesickness” (considered as a disease), Modern Latin (cf. French nostalgie, 1802), coined 1668 by Johannes Hofer, as a rendering of German heimweh, from Greek algos “pain, grief, […]

The Indigenous and the Adopted: a Link?

From here, we have just a brief excerpt from an article about suicide (and other health risks) amongst indigenous people around the world: Some of the reports alarming statistics include, “In the United States, a Native American is 600 times more likely to contract tuberculosis and 62 per cent more likely to commit suicide than […]

Redressing the Second Offense

In a previous post, I asked what strategies we have discovered for addressing those sorts of occasions when we find ourselves face-to-face with with people expressing “opinions” (they almost always call them opinions) that dehumanize, wound, or reprise in the present patterns of abuse associated with our experience of adoption that occurred in the past. […]

Addressing the Second Offense

In reading some of the posts on birthdays, in experiencing as a result some of my own vast, unexpected sadness behind that topic as well as reading it in others, I saw how the trauma expressed, though it references and refers to the past, seems pointedly to occur in the present. This makes me suspect […]

The Adopted & the Incarcerated

I simply wish to pose the question: what links of solidarity do you discern regarding prejudice against the adopted and the incarcerated? By this, I do not intend to imply that a most adequate way to understand adoption occurs if we think about it in a metaphorical or literal way as a prison, though such […]

“You Owe Me”: Indebtedness vs. Gratitude

As trafficked people, we may describes ourselves as having the strange status on the one hand as inferior—as something deemed by others a tradable commodity—and on the other hand as superior—as something so hyper-desired that it permits human beings (us) to get treated as a tradable commodity. Having read a number of posts and responses […]

The Anti-Antiadoption Discourse in “Response” to a New Expose

A researcher, or perhaps a journalist, Kathryn Boyce has recently written an expose, The Child Catchers: Rescue, Trafficking, and the New Gospel of Adoption (published 23 April 2013), on how evangelical Christians are preaching the new gospel of adoption. I haven’t read the book; I’m flagging it down here in case someone wants to. My […]